Athlete's foot, known medically as tinea pedis, is a common skin infection of the feet caused by fungus.[2] Signs and symptoms often include itching, scaling, cracking and redness.[3] In rare cases the skin may blister.[6] Athlete's foot fungus may infect any part of the foot, but most often grows between the toes.[3] The next most common area is the bottom of the foot.[6] The same fungus may also affect the nails or the hands.[4] It is a member of the group of diseases known as tinea.[7]
Garlic has antifungal properties useful to foot fungus treatment, thanks to its compounds such as allicin and ajoene. These natural compounds work to treat the toenail fungus. Mix crushed up garlic or garlic oil with white vinegar. Apply the mixture on and around the infected area and then cover it with a bandage. Leave the bandage on for a few hours. Repeat daily until the toenail fungus clears. Plus, learn about the other signs of disease your feet can reveal.

If common remedies do not offer relief within three to four months of consistent use, or if the discomfort worsens, contact your doctor. Extreme infections may require the temporary surgical removal of the nail. A replacement nail will usually grow. As the new nail regrows, it is good practice to treat it with an antifungal cream to prevent reinfection.


Onychomycosis patients may need to learn new, healthier habits to stop the fungus growing back. These could include protecting toes from sources of infection, wearing correctly fitting footwear, laundering socks in hot water with disinfectant, wearing protective footwear at the pool and gym, keeping nails short, using open-toed footwear and wearing shoes made of breathable material.


Healing time depends on the type of treatment used. Prevention of a new infection is important. Orthopaedic foot and ankle specialists recommend good foot hygiene with frequent changing of stockings and rotating pairs of shoes to allow them to completely dry between uses. Also, avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and around swimming pools. If you have a pedicure, make sure the nail salon uses sterilized instruments.
Trichophyton rubrum is the most common dermatophyte involved in onychomycosis. Other dermatophytes that may be involved are T. interdigitale, Epidermophyton floccosum, T. violaceum, Microsporum gypseum, T. tonsurans, and T. soudanense. A common outdated name that may still be reported by medical laboratories is Trichophyton mentagrophytes for T. interdigitale. The name T. mentagrophytes is now restricted to the agent of favus skin infection of the mouse; though this fungus may be transmitted from mice and their danders to humans, it generally infects skin and not nails.
Fungal nail infections don’t usually lead to serious long-term problems when properly treated, but they may be more serious in certain individuals. This can include people with diabetes or who have a weakened immune system and have trouble fighting off an infection. Even if there is no pain associated with the infection, it is important that you promptly visit your doctor for assessment if you see any abnormal nail changes.

Making a few simple lifestyle changes can help prevent a fungal infection of the nails. Taking good care of your nails by keeping them well trimmed and clean is a good way to prevent infections. You should also avoid injuring the skin around your nails. If you’re going to have damp or wet hands for an extended amount of time, you may want to wear rubber gloves.

This foot fungus treatment contains a fungus that is harmless to the body but still kills the infectious fungus. Mix a cup of cornmeal and two quarts of water in a tub big enough to fit your feet. Let the cornmeal sit in the water for an hour and then soak your foot or feet for a half hour or more. Here are more homemade foot scrub recipes to pamper your feet.
Fungi that are already present in or on your body can cause nail infections. If you have come in contact with someone else who has a fungal infection, it may have spread to you. According to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), fungal infections affect toenails more commonly than fingernails because your toes are usually confined to your shoes, where they’re in a warm, moist environment.
Medications in tablet form are much more effective at fighting nail fungus than topical treatments are, but they aren’t guaranteed to work and also have more side effects, long treatment durations and possible interactions. (7) Another downside is that they are like putting a Band-Aid on the problem — they’re not addressing why the fungus developed in the first place.
A number of different types of fungus can cause onychomycosis including dermatophytes and Fusarium.[3] Risk factors include athlete's foot, other nail diseases, exposure to someone with the condition, peripheral vascular disease, and poor immune function.[3] The diagnosis is generally suspected based on the appearance and confirmed by laboratory testing.[2]
Onychomycosis does not necessarily require treatment.[3] The antifungal medication, terbinafine, taken by mouth appears to be the most effective but is associated with liver problems.[2][4] Trimming the affected nails when on treatment also appears useful.[2] There is a ciclopirox containing nail polish, but it does not work as well.[2] The condition returns in up to half of cases following treatment.[2] Not using old shoes after treatment may decrease the risk of recurrence.[3]
Do the research before trying this product. I sure wish I had. Any "natural" product insures results with regular use but warns that the process takes weeks and even months, due to slow nail growth. These natural remedy sites also warn that you should never reuse the mixture when reapplying because any contamination with the fungus can "inhibit or create more fungus growth." This cancels out the 2nd step altogether given the redipping of the nail brush. Perhaps this product does work for some people after repeated use for many months. I'd just love to see that truth written in more reviews.
White superficial onychomycosis (WSO) is caused by fungal invasion of the superficial layers of the nail plate to form "white islands" on the plate. It accounts for around 10 percent of onychomycosis cases. In some cases, WSO is a misdiagnosis of "keratin granulations" which are not a fungus, but a reaction to nail polish that can cause the nails to have a chalky white appearance. A laboratory test should be performed to confirm.[15]
Toenail fungus, also called onychomycosis, is a common fungal infection of your toenail. The most noticeable symptom is a white, brown, or yellow discoloration of one or more of your toenails. It may spread and cause the nails to thicken or crack. Sandal season or not, toenail fungus typically isn’t what you want to see when you look at your feet. Luckily there are many treatments you can try.
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