Nine out of 10 women are wearing shoes that are too small. The consequences aren't pretty – calluses, blisters, bunions, corns, and other problems. The constant rubbing can irritate the joints in the foot and lead to arthritis. Research suggests many kids are also wearing the wrong shoe size, which puts them at risk for foot deformities as they grow.
For some people, a fungal infection of the nails can be difficult to cure and the first round of medication might not work. The nail infection can’t be considered cured until a new nail that’s free from infection has grown in. Although this indicates that the nail is no longer infected, it’s possible for the fungal infection to return. In severe cases, there may be permanent damage to your nail, and it may have to be removed.
Is it nail psoriasis or fungus? Is it nail psoriasis or fungus? Nail psoriasis is the result of a systemic condition in which the skin, and therefore also the nails, grow too fast. Nail fungus is the result of an infection, and it more common in the toenails. It is important to know the difference, so that effective treatment can be provided. Read now
Athlete's foot is a term given to almost any inflammatory skin disease that affects the sole of the foot and the skin between the toes. It is usually scaly and may be a red, raw-appearing eruption with weeping and oozing with small blisters. It affects the feet of athletes and non-athletes alike. Although it is frequently caused by a fungal infection, other causes may be indistinguishable without proper testing.
White superficial onychomycosis (WSO) is caused by fungal invasion of the superficial layers of the nail plate to form "white islands" on the plate. It accounts for around 10 percent of onychomycosis cases. In some cases, WSO is a misdiagnosis of "keratin granulations" which are not a fungus, but a reaction to nail polish that can cause the nails to have a chalky white appearance. A laboratory test should be performed to confirm.[15]
Griseofulvin (Gris-Peg, Grifulvin V, Griseofulvin Ultramicrosize) is an antibiotic prescribed to treat fungal infections such as ringworm of the body, athlete's foot, barber's itch, and fungal or ringworm of the nails. Side effects, drug interactions, dosing, storage, and pregnancy and breastfeeding information should be reviewed prior to taking this medication.
How to get rid of a yeast infection Many treatments are available for a yeast infection, some of which a person can administer at home. This article looks at 8 home remedies, including probiotics, natural yogurt, and tea tree oil. However, these remedies are not suitable for everyone. Also, learn about symptoms, prevention, and when to see a doctor. Read now

There are several doctors who can provide nail fungus treatment. Your primary care provider, a dermatologist, or a podiatrist can treat nail fungus. Any one of these doctors can provide proper diagnosis and prescribe medications specific to fungal infection. A podiatrist or dermatologist may shave the top layer of the nail off or even remove part of the nail.


Sporty, fitted sandals and other "toning shoes" are designed for a more intense workout while walking. The American Council on Exercise says there's no evidence to support that claim, but they may have other benefits. The thick sole keeps your foot off the ground and away from debris. And Brenner points out, "they do have really good arch support." Several have a seal of approval from the American Podiatric Medical Association.
When visiting a doctor, the basic diagnosis procedure applies. This includes checking the patient's medical history and medical record for risk factors,[11] a medical interview during which the doctor asks questions (such as about itching and scratching), and a physical examination.[11] Athlete's foot can usually be diagnosed by visual inspection of the skin and by identifying less obvious symptoms such as itching of the affected area.
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