The medical name for fungal athlete's foot is tinea pedis. There are a variety of fungi that cause athlete's foot, and these can be contracted in many locations, including gyms, locker rooms, swimming pools, communal showers, nail salons, and from contaminated socks and clothing. The fungi can also be spread directly from person to person by contact. Most people acquire fungus on the feet from walking barefoot in areas where someone else with athlete's foot has recently walked. Some people are simply more prone to this condition while others seem relatively resistant to it. Another colorful name for this condition is "jungle rot," often used by members of the armed services serving in tropical climates.
Trichophyton rubrum is the most common dermatophyte involved in onychomycosis. Other dermatophytes that may be involved are T. interdigitale, Epidermophyton floccosum, T. violaceum, Microsporum gypseum, T. tonsurans, and T. soudanense. A common outdated name that may still be reported by medical laboratories is Trichophyton mentagrophytes for T. interdigitale. The name T. mentagrophytes is now restricted to the agent of favus skin infection of the mouse; though this fungus may be transmitted from mice and their danders to humans, it generally infects skin and not nails.
Onychomycosis – commonly known as toenail fungus – is characterized by inflammation, pain, and swelling of the toe, as well as yellowing, thickening, and crumbling of the nail itself.  Toenail fungus can be the result of abnormal pH of the skin, continuous exposure to moisture, wearing synthetic socks, compromised immune system, sweat build-up in shoes, poor foot hygiene, or weak circulation such as that caused by diabetes.
White superficial onychomycosis (WSO) is caused by fungal invasion of the superficial layers of the nail plate to form "white islands" on the plate. It accounts for around 10 percent of onychomycosis cases. In some cases, WSO is a misdiagnosis of "keratin granulations" which are not a fungus, but a reaction to nail polish that can cause the nails to have a chalky white appearance. A laboratory test should be performed to confirm.[15]
A number of different types of fungus can cause onychomycosis including dermatophytes and Fusarium.[3] Risk factors include athlete's foot, other nail diseases, exposure to someone with the condition, peripheral vascular disease, and poor immune function.[3] The diagnosis is generally suspected based on the appearance and confirmed by laboratory testing.[2]

If you observe any abnormal nail changes it is important to visit your doctor for prompt assessment. In addition to being cosmetically unappealing, OM can also lead to more serious complications, including the possible loss of your nail, bacterial infections, or cellulitis. Speak with your healthcare provider to determine what the best treatment plan is for you.
In other words, the combination of urea and bifonazole got rid of nail fungus in an extra 10 participants. But there was no difference between the two groups six months after treatment. Also, the fungal infection returned in many participants, so it’s likely that neither of the two treatments can increase the chances of getting rid of the fungus in the long term.

One of the more interesting remedies for toenail fungus is organic cornmeal.  Corn naturally hosts a form of fungus that is harmless to the human body but deadly to Candida – the most common fungal parasite that causes infections in people.  In a container big enough to fit your foot (or both feet if needed), mix one cup of cornmeal and about two quarts of water.  Allow the cornmeal to soak in the water for at least one hour then submerge the infected foot (or feet) in the mixture for a half hour or more.  While the frequency of use for this remedy is up for debate, sources have reported success with treatment performed as seldom as once per week.  Others say to perform it daily.  Because cornmeal is totally harmless to skin and nails, realistically the treatment can be repeated as often as you like.
The possible side effects of itraconazole include headaches, dizziness, stomach and bowel problems, and rashes. Itraconazole can also interact with a number of other drugs. These include cholesterol-reducing and blood-sugar-lowering medications, as well as certain sleeping pills. It is therefore important to let your doctor know about any medication you take. Itraconazole is not an option for people with heart failure (cardiac insufficiency). It also isn’t suitable for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding.
Wei, Y.-X., Xu, X.-Y., Xu, & Song, X. (2017). A review of antifungal natural products against the pathogenic fungi causing athletes' foot disease. Current Organic Chemistry, 21, 1–13. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Xun_Song/publication/319128408_A_Review_of_Antifungal_Natural_Products_Against_the_Pathogenic_Fungi_Causing_Athletes'_Foot_Disease/links/59931c65458515c0ce61efa1/A-Review-of-Antifungal-Natural-Products-Against-the-Pathogenic-Fungi-Causing-Athletes-Foot-Disease.pdf
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