Fungal nail infections don’t usually lead to serious long-term problems when properly treated, but they may be more serious in certain individuals. This can include people with diabetes or who have a weakened immune system and have trouble fighting off an infection. Even if there is no pain associated with the infection, it is important that you promptly visit your doctor for assessment if you see any abnormal nail changes.
Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.
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Sometimes people with a fungal nail infection are offered laser treatment. This involves shining infrared or ultraviolet (UV) light on the nail in order to kill the fungi. Laser treatments haven’t been proven to work in good quality studies. Because statutory health insurers in Germany don’t cover the costs of this treatment, people have to pay for it themselves.
Topical nail-bed fungus treatments are a safe option that almost anyone can use. They work best when the infection is treated in its earliest stages. However, these medications do not heal the nail itself, only the fungus growing on the nail bed and surrounding area. Only oral medications, which come with many contraindications and may not be safe for everyone, can treat the nail itself.
The key to effectively fighting toenail fungus with essential oils is consistency. You need to be religious with using essential oils to see lasting results. You can’t do this once a day, then miss a day here and there and say you’re not seeing changes. If you use these two oils four times a day for two months, in 90+ percent of cases, it will clear up your toenail fungus for good!
Topical agents include ciclopirox nail paint, amorolfine, and efinaconazole.[19][20][21] Some topical treatments need to be applied daily for prolonged periods (at least 1 year).[20] Topical amorolfine is applied weekly.[22] Topical ciclopirox results in a cure in 6% to 9% of cases; amorolfine might be more effective.[2][20] Ciclopirox when used with terbinafine appears to be better than either agent alone.[2]

Scratching infected areas may also spread the fungus to the fingers and under the fingernails. If not washed away soon enough, it can infect the fingers and fingernails, growing in the skin and in the nails (not just underneath). After scratching, it can be spread to wherever the person touches, including other parts of the body and to one's environment. Scratching also causes infected skin scales to fall off into one's environment, leading to further possible spread.
Because fungal spores can remain viable for months in these environments, frequent exposure can increase the risk of infection (and re-infection). Fungal spores can be picked up in many ways – such as wearing shoes that harbour the organism, by walking barefoot in areas where the fungus is prevalent (especially public showers and locker rooms), by wearing wet shoes or socks for long periods, through previous injury to the toe or toenail that opens a path for easy entry of the fungus, or by wearing improperly-fitting shoes.

You can use simple home remedies to get rid of toenail fungus. Or a podiatrist can take care of toenail fungus, particularly if it is caught early. Topical or oral treatments can also work on toenail fungus, as well as the removal of the infected nail. A temporary removal can work to treat the area, but a permanent removal so that the bad nail won’t grow back can also be performed.


Toenail fungus, also called onychomycosis, is a common fungal infection of your toenail. The most noticeable symptom is a white, brown, or yellow discoloration of one or more of your toenails. It may spread and cause the nails to thicken or crack. Sandal season or not, toenail fungus typically isn’t what you want to see when you look at your feet. Luckily there are many treatments you can try.
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