Before taking action and finding the best nail fungus treatment for you, it is important to note that toenail fungus and skin fungus, such as athlete’s foot, often manifest together. For the best results, both should be treated at the same time to prevent an ongoing infection. You can recognize athlete’s foot by the dry, scaling, peeling skin on the bottom of the feet. Your feet may also itch, or exude a noticeable odor.
Apply Vick's VapoRub. You can get over the counter vapor rub from Vick's to help your fungus. A study showed that daily application of Vick's VapoRub for 48 weeks can be as effective as topical treatment options such as Ciclopirox 8% for nail fungus.[12] To treat nail fungus with Vick's VapoRub, first make sure your nail is clean and dry. Apply a small amount of Vick's VapoRub on the affected area daily with your finger or a cotton swab, preferably at night. Continue treatment for up to 48 weeks.

Multiple fungi species can infect the nail. Fungus grows well in warm, moist environments such as showers. Fungus infection is one of the few foot problems that affect more men than women, perhaps because more men walk barefoot in locker rooms. Age is a factor, too. Half the sufferers are people older than 70. Other risk factors include having certain medical conditions such as diabetes, vascular insufficiency and malnutrition.


Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.
Psoriasis is a long-term skin condition that may cause large plaques of red, raised skin, flakes of dry skin, and skin scales. There are several types of psoriasis, including psoriasis vulgaris, guttate psoriasis, inverse psoriasis, and pustular psoriasis. Symptoms vary depending on the type of psoriasis the patient has. Treatment of psoriasis may include creams, lotions, oral medications, injections and infusions of biologics, and light therapy. There is no cure for psoriasis.
Healing time depends on the type of treatment used. Prevention of a new infection is important. Orthopaedic foot and ankle specialists recommend good foot hygiene with frequent changing of stockings and rotating pairs of shoes to allow them to completely dry between uses. Also, avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and around swimming pools. If you have a pedicure, make sure the nail salon uses sterilized instruments.

Besides being exposed to any of the modes of transmission presented above, there are additional risk factors that increase one's chance of contracting athlete's foot. Persons who have had athlete's foot before are more likely to become infected than those who have not. Adults are more likely to catch athlete's foot than children. Men have a higher chance of getting athlete's foot than women.[25] People with diabetes or weakened immune systems[25] are more susceptible to the disease. HIV/AIDS hampers the immune system and increases the risk of acquiring athlete's foot. Hyperhidrosis (abnormally increased sweating) increases the risk of infection and makes treatment more difficult.[26]


Athlete’s foot appears as a scaly red rash on the bottoms or sides of the feet often accompanied by itching, dry or cracked skin, stinging, and odor. You can also have moist, raw skin between your toes. Though athlete’s foot is fairly easy to treat with over-the-counter anti-fungal creams or sprays, this foot fungus is quite contagious and may easily spread to your toenails.
The term "ringworm" or "ringworms" refers to fungal infections that are on the surface of the skin. A physical examination of the affected skin, evaluation of skin scrapings under the microscope, and culture tests can help doctors make the appropriate distinctions. A proper diagnosis is essential to successful treatment. Among the different types of ringworm are the following: tinea barbae, tinea capitis, tinea corporis, tinea cruris, tinea faciei, tinea manus, tinea pedis, and tinea unguium.
Athlete’s foot—the most prevalent foot fungus—thrives in warm, sweaty places like the insides of your athletic shoes, which is how it got its name. However, foot fungus can develop in multiple environments, natural and man-made, as long as there is lots of moisture where fungi can grow. These include shared areas at gyms or pools, soil and grass, or even shared items such as shoes, socks, or towels from household members who are infected.  
Athlete’s foot infections can be mild or severe. Some clear up quickly, and others last a long time. Athlete’s foot infections generally respond well to antifungal treatment. However, sometimes fungal infections are difficult to eliminate. Long-term treatment with antifungal medications may be necessary to keep athlete’s foot infections from returning.
Français: se débarrasser d’une onychomycose, Italiano: Liberarsi dall'Onicomicosi, Español: eliminar los hongos de las uñas de los pies (onicomicosis), Deutsch: Zehenpilz loswerden, Português: Se Livrar de Pé de Atleta, 中文: 治疗甲癣, Русский: лечить грибковое поражение ногтя, Nederlands: Van schimmelnagels afkomen, Bahasa Indonesia: Menyingkirkan Jamur di Jari Kaki, Čeština: Jak vyléčit plíseň na nehtech, ไทย: กำจัดเชื้อราที่เล็บเท้า, हिन्दी: पैर के फंगल संक्रमण से छुटकारा पाएँ, العربية: التخلّص من فطريات الأظافر, Tiếng Việt: Điều trị Nấm móng chân
Treatment options during pregnancy may include dilute vinegar soaks or sprays (roughly one part white household vinegar to four parts water) and Lotrimin cream twice a day for two to three weeks to the soles. Antifungal pills are generally not recommended during pregnancy because of the potential side effects and possible fetal harm. Always check with your OB/GYN before using any medication or treatment during pregnancy.
Treatment: Nail fungus is a difficult condition to properly treat due to the average time before seeing results and the general lack of understanding regarding topical treatments. Fungus grows underneath the nail bed, making it extremely difficult to target. Certain nail fungus products, like topical ointments, contain nail penetrating ingredients that treat fungal nail infections underneath the nail bed where it grows.

When athlete's foot fungus or infested skin particles spread to one's environment (such as to clothes, shoes, bathroom, etc.) whether through scratching, falling, or rubbing off, not only can they infect other people, they can also reinfect (or further infect) the host they came from. For example, infected feet infest one's socks and shoes which further expose the feet to the fungus and its spores when worn again.
The newer drugs are unlikely to cause any liver problems in patients without known liver disease. Blood tests are not needed for once-weekly treatment with fluconazole (Diflucan); however, people taking longer courses often have their liver function tested before starting the medicine and then retested during the course of treatment. It is important to notify the doctor of all side effects while on the medication. You should tell your doctor of all current medications to prevent potential serious drug interactions.
Treatment options during pregnancy may include dilute vinegar soaks or sprays (roughly one part white household vinegar to four parts water) and Lotrimin cream twice a day for two to three weeks to the soles. Antifungal pills are generally not recommended during pregnancy because of the potential side effects and possible fetal harm. Always check with your OB/GYN before using any medication or treatment during pregnancy.
Onychomycosis, also known as tinea unguium, is a fungal infection of the nail.[2] Symptoms may include white or yellow nail discoloration, thickening of the nail, and separation of the nail from the nail bed.[2][3] Toenails or fingernails may be affected, but it is more common for toenails to be affected.[3] Complications may include cellulitis of the lower leg.[3]
Efinaconazole (Jublia) is a medication that was approved in 2014. It is a topical (applied to the skin) antifungal used for the local treatment of toenail fungus due to two most common fungal species affecting nails (Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes). Once-daily application is required for 48 weeks. The most common side effects of Jublia are ingrown toenails and application site dermatitis and pain.
Red or black nails due to a hematoma, or blood under the nail, usually occur from trauma (like whacking yourself on the thumb with a hammer). The discolored area will grow out with the nail and be trimmed off as you trim your nails. If you have a black spot under your nail that was not caused by trauma, you may want to see a dermatologist or a podiatrist if it involves a toenail to make sure it is not melanoma (a type of skin cancer associated with pigmented cells). A simple biopsy can rule out malignancy (cancer).
There are several doctors who can provide nail fungus treatment. Your primary care provider, a dermatologist, or a podiatrist can treat nail fungus. Any one of these doctors can provide proper diagnosis and prescribe medications specific to fungal infection. A podiatrist or dermatologist may shave the top layer of the nail off or even remove part of the nail.
Athlete’s foot is one of the most common foot infections. It can be easily acquired, especially by people who often use communal showers and pools, such as those in college dorms or gyms. It grows in warm, damp places like public showers, locker rooms, and pools. It is also common with shoes that are too tight or socks or shoes that are damp. Athletes foot is contracted from getting pedicures with not properly sanitized equipment.
Fungal nail infections can be difficult to treat. Talk with your doctor if self-care strategies and over-the-counter (nonprescription) products haven't helped. Treatment depends on the severity of your condition and the type of fungus causing it. It can take months to see results. And even if your nail condition improves, repeat infections are common.
The Internet is filled with anecdotal information on how to cure toenail fungus using home remedies. Vinegar is a commonly recommended home remedy. Some people apply various oils such as tea tree oil, coconut oil, essential oils, and oil of cedar leaf (such as Vicks VapoRub) to their nails as well. The effectiveness of these home remedies is highly doubtful. Application of household bleach and hydrogen peroxide is also not recommended due to lack of evidence that these treatments work. These agents can also cause unwanted skin irritation. Thickened nails that have been affected by fungus can be difficult to trim. Using topical urea cream will soften the nail and make it easier to trim. These creams do not require a prescription.
Rotate your shoes – Change your shoes often. Even though you may have that favorite pair that you like to wear all the time, it is better for your feet to switch up your shoes from time to time. Even wearing the same pair of shoes two days in a row can elevate your risk for toenail fungus. Place shoes that you are not wearing in an area where they will get plenty of air.
Athlete’s foot appears as a scaly red rash on the bottoms or sides of the feet often accompanied by itching, dry or cracked skin, stinging, and odor. You can also have moist, raw skin between your toes. Though athlete’s foot is fairly easy to treat with over-the-counter anti-fungal creams or sprays, this foot fungus is quite contagious and may easily spread to your toenails.
You may use other antifungal treatments, such as antifungal nail lacquer or topical solutions. These treatments are brushed onto the nail in the same way that you would apply nail polish. Depending on the type of fungus causing the infection, as well as the extent of the infection, you may have to use these medications for several months. Topical solutions are not generally effective in curing toenail fungal infections.
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