Medical treatment of onychomycosis is suggested in patients who are experiencing pain and discomfort due to the nail changes. Patients with higher risk factors for infections such as diabetes and a previous history of cellulitis (infection of the soft tissue) near the affected nails may also benefit from treatment. Poor cosmetic appearance is another reason for medical treatment.
Fungal infection occurs when the organism invades through an opening in the nail, meaning fungi will usually attack nails that are already damaged. After infection occurs, the growth of the fungi leads to mild inflammation, which causes the nail to thicken and the nail plate to detach from the nail bed. The space underneath the nail can then serve as a reservoir for bacteria and moulds, which can cause the nail to become discoloured.

Conventional treatment typically involves thoroughly washing the feet daily or twice daily, followed by the application of a topical medication. Because the outer skin layers are damaged and susceptible to reinfection, topical treatment generally continues until all layers of the skin are replaced, about 2–6 weeks after symptoms disappear. Keeping feet dry and practicing good hygiene (as described in the above section on prevention) is crucial for killing the fungus and preventing reinfection.
Because you’re removing the majority of sugars and grains from your diet, in addition to fiber, I also recommend increasing the amount of protein-rich foods you’re eating. Make sure to buy grass-fed meat; organic, cage-free eggs or poultry; raw, unpasteurized dairy; and wild-caught fish — this is key for obtaining enough protein while also reducing toxins in your diet.

Prevent future occurrences. There are many situations that make you more at risk for infection. You are at a higher risk if you are older, have diabetes, have an impaired immune system, or have poor circulation. If you are at high risk, you should take extra care to prevent infection. Preventative measures include wearing shoes or sandals when you are at damp public areas such as swimming pools or gyms, keeping your toenails clipped and clean, making sure your feet are dry, and drying your feet after you shower.


When the skin is injured damaged, the natural protective skin barrier is broken. Bacteria and yeasts can then invade the broken skin. Bacteria can cause a bad smell. Bacterial infection of the skin and resulting inflammation is known as cellulitis. This is especially likely to occur in individuals with diabetes, chronic leg swelling, who have had veins removed (such as for heart bypass surgery), or in the elderly. Bacterial skin infections also occur more frequently in patients with impaired immune systems.
Over-the-counter toenail fungus treatments can cure existing infections, but only products which include 1% Tolnaftate can prevent a recurrence of the condition. Tolnaftate is the only ingredient approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the prevention of fungal infections. Treating toe nail area fungus is only part of the solution. Preventing further outbreaks using a product with 1% Tolnaftate will keep you looking and feeling your best.

If you love the look of ballet flats, over-the-counter inserts (shown here) may help prevent mild foot pain. Heel pads can provide extra cushioning for achy heels. And custom orthotics can ease a whole range of foot pains and problems. Podiatrists prescribe these inserts to provide arch support and reduce pressure on sensitive areas. Prescription orthotics can be pricey, but are sometimes covered by insurance.


Topical agents such as amorolfine (Loceryl 5% nail lacquer; applied once or twice a week) and ciclopirox (Penlac 8% nail lacquer; applied daily) are usually prescribed for mild forms of the disease, but the treatment periods are long and their efficacy is somewhat limited due to poor nail plate penetration. These medications kill fungi by interfering with their cell membranes, which leads to their death.

Topical antifungal agents can be used but are often ineffective. Oral terbinafine is considered to be the first-line treatment for confirmed onychomycosis; the treatment course is generally 6 weeks for fingernails and 12 weeks for toenails.9 Azoles can also be used. Surgical debridement or removal of the affected nail is also a consideration for cases that are resistant to antifungals, and laser treatments for onychomycosis appear to be a promising area for future study.10
Do the research before trying this product. I sure wish I had. Any "natural" product insures results with regular use but warns that the process takes weeks and even months, due to slow nail growth. These natural remedy sites also warn that you should never reuse the mixture when reapplying because any contamination with the fungus can "inhibit or create more fungus growth." This cancels out the 2nd step altogether given the redipping of the nail brush. Perhaps this product does work for some people after repeated use for many months. I'd just love to see that truth written in more reviews.
Nine out of 10 women are wearing shoes that are too small. The consequences aren't pretty – calluses, blisters, bunions, corns, and other problems. The constant rubbing can irritate the joints in the foot and lead to arthritis. Research suggests many kids are also wearing the wrong shoe size, which puts them at risk for foot deformities as they grow.
Satchell, A. C., Saurajen, A., Bell, C., & Barnetson, R. StC. (2002, July 19). Treatment of interdigital tinea pedis with 25% and 50% tea tree oil solution: A randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded study [Abstract]. Australasian Journal of Dermatology, 43(3), 175–178. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1440-0960.2002.00590.x/full
As both an antiseptic and fungicidal remedy, tea tree oil is a great remedy for onychomycosis.  First clean areas on and around the infection with rubbing alcohol then apply undiluted 100% pure tea tree oil (such as this Plant Therapy Tea Tree Oil) directly to the affected nails and let it soak in.  After about ten minutes, gently scrub the nail with a soft bristle toothbrush.  When applying tea tree oil directly to skin, consider mixing the oil one-to-one with an all-natural carrier, like olive or almond oil.  Repeat daily until the new healthy nail grows out completely, then continue treatment for two to three more weeks to prevent regrowth.

Red or black nails due to a hematoma, or blood under the nail, usually occur from trauma (like whacking yourself on the thumb with a hammer). The discolored area will grow out with the nail and be trimmed off as you trim your nails. If you have a black spot under your nail that was not caused by trauma, you may want to see a dermatologist or a podiatrist if it involves a toenail to make sure it is not melanoma (a type of skin cancer associated with pigmented cells). A simple biopsy can rule out malignancy (cancer).


Over-the-counter antifungal treatments. Antifungal creams and ointments treat toenail infections while helping to keep new fungus out so new nails can grow. Some treatments must be applied every day, others are applied once a week. It’s a good idea to apply topical treatments to both the foot and nail simultaneously to prevent foot fungus from spreading to the toes. If you trim your toenails well (see above) before applying an antifungal, the medicine can reach deeper into the nailbed.

If you can consume a diet that’s high in good fats and proteins along with some quality fiber — and really reduce the sugar and starches — then you’ll be on the path to eliminating candida in your body, and therefore signs of toenail fungus. Here are some more details on which types of foods to limit or remove from your diet in order to combat yeast and fungal overgrowth …


Besides being exposed to any of the modes of transmission presented above, there are additional risk factors that increase one's chance of contracting athlete's foot. Persons who have had athlete's foot before are more likely to become infected than those who have not. Adults are more likely to catch athlete's foot than children. Men have a higher chance of getting athlete's foot than women.[25] People with diabetes or weakened immune systems[25] are more susceptible to the disease. HIV/AIDS hampers the immune system and increases the risk of acquiring athlete's foot. Hyperhidrosis (abnormally increased sweating) increases the risk of infection and makes treatment more difficult.[26]
One of the more interesting remedies for toenail fungus is organic cornmeal.  Corn naturally hosts a form of fungus that is harmless to the human body but deadly to Candida – the most common fungal parasite that causes infections in people.  In a container big enough to fit your foot (or both feet if needed), mix one cup of cornmeal and about two quarts of water.  Allow the cornmeal to soak in the water for at least one hour then submerge the infected foot (or feet) in the mixture for a half hour or more.  While the frequency of use for this remedy is up for debate, sources have reported success with treatment performed as seldom as once per week.  Others say to perform it daily.  Because cornmeal is totally harmless to skin and nails, realistically the treatment can be repeated as often as you like.
To get rid of foot fungus like Athlete's Foot, start by applying an over-the-counter antifungal ointment, spray, powder, or cream to the affected area. You can also try taking an over-the-counter medication like butenafine or clotrimazole, but see your doctor for a prescription medication if your case is severe. If you're interested in a homeopathic solution, apply 100% tea tree oil to the affected area 2-3 times per day. To prevent the fungus from returning, wash your feet with antibacterial soap and dry them thoroughly, especially between your toes!
Modern treatments made surgery a last resort. “Before we had these 21st century medications, we didn’t have a good choice in how to deal with toenail fungus,” said Dr. Hinkes. “Oftentimes patients would come in, and out of frustration and lack of any real significant clinical cure with medication, they would ask for their nails to be permanently removed.”

Occlusive shoe materials, such as vinyl, which cause the feet to remain moist, provide an excellent area for the fungus to proliferate. Likewise, absorbent socks like cotton that wick water away from your feet may help. Some individuals who sweat excessively benefit from the application of antiperspirants like 20% aluminum chloride (Drysol). Powders can help keep your feet dry. Although counterintuitive, if your feet can be soaked in a solution of aluminum acetate (Burow's solution or Domeboro solution) and then air dried with a fan, this can be very helpful if performed three or four times within 30 minutes. A home remedy of dilute white vinegar soaks, using one part vinegar and roughly four parts water, once or twice a day (as 10-minute foot soaks) may aid in treatment followed by evaporation can be helpful.
Over-the-counter toenail fungus treatments can cure existing infections, but only products which include 1% Tolnaftate can prevent a recurrence of the condition. Tolnaftate is the only ingredient approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the prevention of fungal infections. Treating toe nail area fungus is only part of the solution. Preventing further outbreaks using a product with 1% Tolnaftate will keep you looking and feeling your best.
Ringworm, also called tinea corporis, is not a worm, but a fungal infection of the skin. It can appear anywhere on the body and it looks like a circular, red, flat sore. It is often accompanied by scaly skin. The outer part of the sore can be raised while the skin in the middle appears normal. Ringworm can be unsightly, but it is usually not a serious condition.
Prescription oral antifungals such as terbinafine (Lamisil) or fluconazole (Diflucan) are traditionally used to treat toenail fungus. These treatments are often effective, but they may cause serious side effects ranging from upset stomach and dizziness to severe skin problems and jaundice. This may be why many people try home remedies instead. Here are 10 of these popular at-home treatments.
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