The most common symptom of a fungal nail infection is the nail becoming thickened and discoloured: white, black, yellow or green. As the infection progresses the nail can become brittle, with pieces breaking off or coming away from the toe or finger completely. If left untreated, the skin underneath and around the nail can become inflamed and painful. There may also be white or yellow patches on the nailbed or scaly skin next to the nail,[6] and a foul smell.[7] There is usually no pain or other bodily symptoms, unless the disease is severe.[8] People with onychomycosis may experience significant psychosocial problems due to the appearance of the nail, particularly when fingers – which are always visible – rather than toenails are affected.[9]

Athlete's foot is a term given to almost any inflammatory skin disease that affects the sole of the foot and the skin between the toes. It is usually scaly and may be a red, raw-appearing eruption with weeping and oozing with small blisters. It affects the feet of athletes and non-athletes alike. Although it is frequently caused by a fungal infection, other causes may be indistinguishable without proper testing.

The first step is to take a history of the problem,” said Mark Hinkes, DPM, CEO of HappyFeet LLC, and a podiatrist with 40 years experience. “In other words, I want to know how long have you had this and what previous treatment you’ve had.” A podiatrist needs to understand the extent of the problem, and also any other medical factors which may influence their choice of treatment.

When the skin is injured damaged, the natural protective skin barrier is broken. Bacteria and yeasts can then invade the broken skin. Bacteria can cause a bad smell. Bacterial infection of the skin and resulting inflammation is known as cellulitis. This is especially likely to occur in individuals with diabetes, chronic leg swelling, who have had veins removed (such as for heart bypass surgery), or in the elderly. Bacterial skin infections also occur more frequently in patients with impaired immune systems.
Topical agents such as amorolfine (Loceryl 5% nail lacquer; applied once or twice a week) and ciclopirox (Penlac 8% nail lacquer; applied daily) are usually prescribed for mild forms of the disease, but the treatment periods are long and their efficacy is somewhat limited due to poor nail plate penetration. These medications kill fungi by interfering with their cell membranes, which leads to their death.
Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.
​The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) offers information on this site as an educational service. The content of FootCareMD, including text, images and graphics, is for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to substitute for professional medical advice, diagnoses or treatments. If you need medical advice, use the "Find an Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Surgeon" tool at the top of this page or contact your primary doctor. 
I fully believe in natural remedies as well as safe, pharmaceutical ones. I have all of the ingredients and essential oils necessary to make my own potions, but as a busy, working Mom I chose the easy route of purchasing the potion already made up. I used this religiously for over a month. I cleaned and trimmed my affected 4 toenails constantly through the process. I saw absolutely no results. Yes, the painted on 2nd step does temporarily improve the appearance of the nail instantly, but that's because of the glossy sheen. Any oil will do that. Once soaked in, my nail looked and remained the same. Perhaps my failure was a result of dipping the brush I used on my infected toes and back into the bottle repeated times. Doesn't that seem counter productive given a fast-spreading fungus? They're slowly growing out but the fungus remains in the grow out and my nails are still thin and fragile. I would have given this product one more star with a pat on the back and a "nice try" but the huge number of immediate, 5-star reviews left me with the instant feeling of being mislead. I may have even given it more time with more realistic reviews.

Swelling and redness of the skin around the nail is called paronychia. This is an infection of the skin at the bottom of the nail (cuticle). If the infection is acute (has a rapid onset), it is usually caused by bacteria. It may respond to warm soaks but will often need to be drained by a doctor. A chronic paronychia occurs when a cuticle becomes inflamed or irritated over time. Sometimes, yeast will take advantage of the damaged skin and infect the area as well. Therapy begins with keeping the skin dry and out of water. If the problem continues, a physician should be consulted. Antibiotics are not often used but may be necessary in severe infection.


Modern medicine addresses toenail fungus with topical treatments, oral anti-fungal medicine, and in some cases surgical removal of the nail.  Side effects of these medications may possibly include trouble breathing, swelling of the mouth or face, hives, rashes, blisters, headaches, dizziness, nausea, loss of appetite, liver damage, weight gain, fatigue, heart problems, fever, diarrhea, and more pain – all just to get rid of fungus on your toenails.

Foot pain may be caused by injuries (sprains, strains, bruises, and fractures), diseases (diabetes, Hansen disease, and gout), viruses, fungi, and bacteria (plantar warts and athlete's foot), or even ingrown toenails. Pain and tenderness may be accompanied by joint looseness, swelling, weakness, discoloration, and loss of function. Minor foot pain can usually be treated with rest, ice, compression, and elevation and OTC medications such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen. Severe pain should be treated by a medical professional.


Athlete's foot was first medically described in 1908.[9] Globally, athlete's foot affects about 15% of the population.[2] Males are more often affected than females.[4] It occurs most frequently in older children or younger adults.[4] Historically it is believed to have been a rare condition, that became more frequent in the 1900s due to the greater use of shoes, health clubs, war, and travel.[10]
Onychomycosis patients may need to learn new, healthier habits to stop the fungus growing back. These could include protecting toes from sources of infection, wearing correctly fitting footwear, laundering socks in hot water with disinfectant, wearing protective footwear at the pool and gym, keeping nails short, using open-toed footwear and wearing shoes made of breathable material.
One of the best remedies for toenail fungus, apple cider vinegar can be used topically, internally, or both. Mix one part ACV and one part Epsom salts with six parts hot water.  Let the water cool so that it is still warm to the touch, but not so hot as to be damaging to your skin.  Soak feet up to twice daily for at least thirty minutes to kill fungus.  Mix two tablespoons of organic apple cider vinegar with eight ounces of warm water and add a teaspoon of honey to sweeten the beverage.
To get rid of foot fungus like Athlete's Foot, start by applying an over-the-counter antifungal ointment, spray, powder, or cream to the affected area. You can also try taking an over-the-counter medication like butenafine or clotrimazole, but see your doctor for a prescription medication if your case is severe. If you're interested in a homeopathic solution, apply 100% tea tree oil to the affected area 2-3 times per day. To prevent the fungus from returning, wash your feet with antibacterial soap and dry them thoroughly, especially between your toes!

Terbinafine can cause gastrointestinal (stomach and bowel) problems and a temporary loss of taste and smell. It can also interact with certain antidepressants and heart medications. Overall, terbinafine has far fewer drug-drug interactions than itraconazole. Nevertheless, it’s still important to tell your doctor if you are taking any other medication. As a precaution, this medication should not be taken during pregnancy or if you are breastfeeding.
A band of tissue called the plantar fascia runs along the bottom of the foot. It pulls on the heel when you walk -- and it works best with the proper arch in your foot. Walking barefoot, or in flimsy shoes without sufficient arch support, can overstretch, tear, or inflame the plantar fascia. This common condition can cause intense heel pain, and resting the feet only provides temporary relief.

Toenail fungus, also know as onychomcosis, is characterized by inflammation, thickening, swelling, yellowing, and pain of the toenail and toe. Another symptom is crumbling of the toenail. It’s caused by an abnormal PH of the skin, which can happen because of poor hygiene, a bad immune system, exposure to high levels of moisture, and/or poor circulation. These toenail fungus treatments will prevent or get rid of the problem.
Not all cases of OM require treatment with medication but if your doctor has confirmed you have OM and require treatment, they may prescribe an oral antifungal medication (terbinafine, itraconazole*) based on the type of fungus causing the infection. If you are unable to take oral antifungals or have a mild-to-moderate case of OM, your doctor may opt for a topical therapy (ciclopirox, efinaconazole*) that is applied to the affected nail(s) directly.
Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.
The Internet is filled with anecdotal information on how to cure toenail fungus using home remedies. Vinegar is a commonly recommended home remedy. Some people apply various oils such as tea tree oil, coconut oil, essential oils, and oil of cedar leaf (such as Vicks VapoRub) to their nails as well. The effectiveness of these home remedies is highly doubtful. Application of household bleach and hydrogen peroxide is also not recommended due to lack of evidence that these treatments work. These agents can also cause unwanted skin irritation. Thickened nails that have been affected by fungus can be difficult to trim. Using topical urea cream will soften the nail and make it easier to trim. These creams do not require a prescription.
Treating the feet is not always enough. Once socks or shoes are infested with fungi, wearing them again can reinfect (or further infect) the feet. Socks can be effectively cleaned in the wash by adding bleach or by washing in water 60° C (140° F).[32] Washing with bleach may help with shoes, but the only way to be absolutely certain that one cannot contract the disease again from a particular pair of shoes is to dispose of those shoes.
Onychomycosis does not necessarily require treatment.[3] The antifungal medication, terbinafine, taken by mouth appears to be the most effective but is associated with liver problems.[2][4] Trimming the affected nails when on treatment also appears useful.[2] There is a ciclopirox containing nail polish, but it does not work as well.[2] The condition returns in up to half of cases following treatment.[2] Not using old shoes after treatment may decrease the risk of recurrence.[3]

I fully believe in natural remedies as well as safe, pharmaceutical ones. I have all of the ingredients and essential oils necessary to make my own potions, but as a busy, working Mom I chose the easy route of purchasing the potion already made up. I used this religiously for over a month. I cleaned and trimmed my affected 4 toenails constantly through the process. I saw absolutely no results. Yes, the painted on 2nd step does temporarily improve the appearance of the nail instantly, but that's because of the glossy sheen. Any oil will do that. Once soaked in, my nail looked and remained the same. Perhaps my failure was a result of dipping the brush I used on my infected toes and back into the bottle repeated times. Doesn't that seem counter productive given a fast-spreading fungus? They're slowly growing out but the fungus remains in the grow out and my nails are still thin and fragile. I would have given this product one more star with a pat on the back and a "nice try" but the huge number of immediate, 5-star reviews left me with the instant feeling of being mislead. I may have even given it more time with more realistic reviews.
You may first notice a fungal toenail infection as a small white or yellow spot on the tip of your toenail, especially the big toe. As the infection progresses, the toenail can become yellow, brittle—even crumbly—and thick and uneven-looking. In the worst fungal infections, the toenail separates from the nail bed. This is called onycholysis. As fungal infections worsen, the nail beds can be tender to the touch and quite painful. Sometimes women try to pretend the pain is “normal” and ignore it altogether.
Trichophyton rubrum is the most common dermatophyte involved in onychomycosis. Other dermatophytes that may be involved are T. interdigitale, Epidermophyton floccosum, T. violaceum, Microsporum gypseum, T. tonsurans, and T. soudanense. A common outdated name that may still be reported by medical laboratories is Trichophyton mentagrophytes for T. interdigitale. The name T. mentagrophytes is now restricted to the agent of favus skin infection of the mouse; though this fungus may be transmitted from mice and their danders to humans, it generally infects skin and not nails.
Toe infections sound scary, but they’re infections of the nails, most commonly caused by ingrown toenails. The toenail grows into the side of the toe, into the soft tissue there, and the skin begins to grow over it. It can get infected very quickly and is most commonly seen in big toes. This condition is painful, and an infection can be a serious problem.

For this treatment, the affected toe or finger first has to be soaked in warm water for ten minutes and then dried. After that, the urea-based cream is applied to the nail, and the nail is covered with an adhesive bandage. After 24 hours, the bandage is removed and the toe or finger is held in warm water again. The softened layer of the nail is then scraped off using a spatula, the cream is applied again and the nail is covered with a new bandage. This treatment is carried out over 14 days. Once the infected part of the nail has been scraped away completely, the skin beneath is treated for another four weeks with a bifonazole cream.
This foot fungus treatment contains a fungus that is harmless to the body but still kills the infectious fungus. Mix a cup of cornmeal and two quarts of water in a tub big enough to fit your feet. Let the cornmeal sit in the water for an hour and then soak your foot or feet for a half hour or more. Here are more homemade foot scrub recipes to pamper your feet.
Take oral medication. The most effective way to get rid of nail fungus is systemic treatment with oral prescription antifungals. Treatment with oral medications can take 2-3 months or longer. Oral antifungal prescription medications include Lamisil, which is usually prescribed with a dose of 250 mg a day for 12 weeks. Side effects can include rash, diarrhea, or liver enzyme abnormalities. This medication should not be used if you have liver or kidney issues.
Fungal nail infections can be difficult to treat. Talk with your doctor if self-care strategies and over-the-counter (nonprescription) products haven't helped. Treatment depends on the severity of your condition and the type of fungus causing it. It can take months to see results. And even if your nail condition improves, repeat infections are common.
To get rid of toe fungus, apply 100% tea tree oil to the affected area with a cotton swab twice a day. You can also try applying Vick's VapoRub to your toe every night before you go to sleep, which may make the fungus go away. Another home remedy you can try is snakeroot leaf extract, which may clear up the fungus if you apply it to the affected area every 3 days. If home remedies aren't helping, talk to your doctor about getting an oral or topical antifungal medication.

Brittle (crumbly) nails and a whitish-yellowish or brownish discoloration are typical signs of nail fungus. The nails may also become thicker and change shape. The affected part of the nail sometimes detaches from the nail bed. The treatment options for nail fungus include nail polishes and creams as well as tablets. Nail polishes and creams are available in pharmacies without a prescription.
Athlete's foot was first medically described in 1908.[9] Globally, athlete's foot affects about 15% of the population.[2] Males are more often affected than females.[4] It occurs most frequently in older children or younger adults.[4] Historically it is believed to have been a rare condition, that became more frequent in the 1900s due to the greater use of shoes, health clubs, war, and travel.[10]
Anyone reporting immediate results or healing is either paid to post the review or doesn't have a true nail fungus. I have been using the solution for about 3 weeks now and can see progress/improvement, which is more than what I can say about other anti-fungal products I have tried. It appears to have contained the infection and the nail is growing it out.

Research suggests that fungi are sensitive to heat, typically 40–60 °C (104–140 °F). The basis of laser treatment is to try to heat the nail bed to these temperatures in order to disrupt fungal growth.[37] As of 2013 research into laser treatment seems promising.[2] There is also ongoing development in photodynamic therapy, which uses laser or LED light to activate photosensitisers that eradicate fungi.[38]


Multiple fungi species can infect the nail. Fungus grows well in warm, moist environments such as showers. Fungus infection is one of the few foot problems that affect more men than women, perhaps because more men walk barefoot in locker rooms. Age is a factor, too. Half the sufferers are people older than 70. Other risk factors include having certain medical conditions such as diabetes, vascular insufficiency and malnutrition.
The most reliable way to diagnose athlete’s foot is to correctly identify its cause. Fungal athlete's foot is relatively straightforward to diagnose and treat. Visualization of the fungus in skin scrapings removed from the affected areas of the feet is a painless and cost-effective method for diagnosis. Rarely, it is necessary to identify fungi in portions of skin removed during a biopsy. If no fungus is found, other causes of athlete's foot must be investigated.
Conventional treatment typically involves thoroughly washing the feet daily or twice daily, followed by the application of a topical medication. Because the outer skin layers are damaged and susceptible to reinfection, topical treatment generally continues until all layers of the skin are replaced, about 2–6 weeks after symptoms disappear. Keeping feet dry and practicing good hygiene (as described in the above section on prevention) is crucial for killing the fungus and preventing reinfection.
Red or black nails due to a hematoma, or blood under the nail, usually occur from trauma (like whacking yourself on the thumb with a hammer). The discolored area will grow out with the nail and be trimmed off as you trim your nails. If you have a black spot under your nail that was not caused by trauma, you may want to see a dermatologist or a podiatrist if it involves a toenail to make sure it is not melanoma (a type of skin cancer associated with pigmented cells). A simple biopsy can rule out malignancy (cancer).
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