Satchell, A. C., Saurajen, A., Bell, C., & Barnetson, R. StC. (2002, July 19). Treatment of interdigital tinea pedis with 25% and 50% tea tree oil solution: A randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded study [Abstract]. Australasian Journal of Dermatology, 43(3), 175–178. Retrieved from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1440-0960.2002.00590.x/full

Modern medicine addresses toenail fungus with topical treatments, oral anti-fungal medicine, and in some cases surgical removal of the nail.  Side effects of these medications may possibly include trouble breathing, swelling of the mouth or face, hives, rashes, blisters, headaches, dizziness, nausea, loss of appetite, liver damage, weight gain, fatigue, heart problems, fever, diarrhea, and more pain – all just to get rid of fungus on your toenails.


Terbinafine can cause gastrointestinal (stomach and bowel) problems and a temporary loss of taste and smell. It can also interact with certain antidepressants and heart medications. Overall, terbinafine has far fewer drug-drug interactions than itraconazole. Nevertheless, it’s still important to tell your doctor if you are taking any other medication. As a precaution, this medication should not be taken during pregnancy or if you are breastfeeding.
According to the UK's National Health Service, "Athlete’s foot is very contagious and can be spread through direct and indirect contact."[24] The disease may spread to others directly when they touch the infection. People can contract the disease indirectly by coming into contact with contaminated items (clothes, towels, etc.) or surfaces (such as bathroom, shower, or locker room floors). The fungi that cause athlete's foot can easily spread to one's environment. Fungi rub off of fingers and bare feet, but also travel on the dead skin cells that continually fall off the body. Athlete's foot fungi and infested skin particles and flakes may spread to socks, shoes, clothes, to other people, pets (via petting), bed sheets, bathtubs, showers, sinks, counters, towels, rugs, floors, and carpets.
One way to definitively get rid of toenail fungus is by surgery. Surgical treatment of onychomycosis involves nail removal. However, this often only provides temporary relief, and recurrence is common unless additional antifungal medication (oral or topical) is simultaneously used. However, surgical removal may be warranted when the affected nail is associated with other factors such as trauma and or infection.
Try using oil of oregano along with another essential oil called melaleuca, which is also known as tea tree oil. The uses of tea tree oil will astound you, including its ability to act as a natural antifungal agent. Use these two oils topically on your toenail fungus daily. I recommend three drops of oil of oregano and two drops of melaleuca applied directly on the toenail, four times a day, ideally.

Ciclopirox (Penlac) topical solution 8% is a medical nail lacquer that has been approved to treat finger or toenail fungus that does not involve the white portion of the nail (lunula) in people with normal immune systems. In one study, ciclopirox got rid of the fungus 22% of the time. The medication is applied to affected nails once daily for up to one year. The lacquer must be wiped clean with alcohol once a week.
Anyone reporting immediate results or healing is either paid to post the review or doesn't have a true nail fungus. I have been using the solution for about 3 weeks now and can see progress/improvement, which is more than what I can say about other anti-fungal products I have tried. It appears to have contained the infection and the nail is growing it out.
Oils such as olive oil and sunflower oil contain ozone gas. A 2011 study published in the Brazilian Journal of Microbiology, showed that small doses of this kind of ozone, applied over a short period, can eliminate fungus. A different study, conducted at the National Center for Scientific Research, Cuba, found that sunflower oil was more effective than the prescription drug Xolegel (ketoconazole).

Toenail injury: There are two types of injuries that can occur to your toenail. The first is acute trauma where the nail is impacted over and over again as in the case of a runner wearing shoes that don’t fit well. The other thing that can happen is blunt trauma where something falls on your toe such as a heavy object and causes an injury. This injury makes your toenail more susceptible to fungus. It is important in both cases to look after your toenails properly to avoid an infection.


Multiple fungi species can infect the nail. Fungus grows well in warm, moist environments such as showers. Fungus infection is one of the few foot problems that affect more men than women, perhaps because more men walk barefoot in locker rooms. Age is a factor, too. Half the sufferers are people older than 70. Other risk factors include having certain medical conditions such as diabetes, vascular insufficiency and malnutrition.
Nail-bed fungus is also called onychomycosis. It can affect anyone regardless of age, gender and hygiene and is spread by direct contact with skin or with infected surfaces. Common places you may be exposed to fungus are at nail salons, as well as showers at hotels, pools, nail salons, and gyms where you go barefoot. Housemates and family members with a fungal infection may also spread their condition.
Trim infected nails. Using large toenail clippers and/or nail nippers, keep your toenails well-trimmed by cutting them straight across to the toe line. Thin thickened nails by gently scraping away the crumbly debris under the nail with a file. This will get rid of some fungus and help reduce pain by alleviating pressure on the nail bed and toes. Soak your toes first to soften the nails or trim after a shower.

Athlete’s foot—the most prevalent foot fungus—thrives in warm, sweaty places like the insides of your athletic shoes, which is how it got its name. However, foot fungus can develop in multiple environments, natural and man-made, as long as there is lots of moisture where fungi can grow. These include shared areas at gyms or pools, soil and grass, or even shared items such as shoes, socks, or towels from household members who are infected.  
The ease with which the fungus spreads to other areas of the body (on one's fingers) poses another complication. When the fungus is spread to other parts of the body, it can easily be spread back to the feet after the feet have been treated. And because the condition is called something else in each place it takes hold (e.g., tinea corporis (ringworm) or tinea cruris (jock itch), persons infected may not be aware it is the same disease.
Nail fungus is usually harmless. But many people find discolored or thickened nails unpleasant to look at and want to get rid of the fungus as soon as possible. Fungal nail infections can also spread, and may infect other people. Regardless of the treatment you choose, it will take a while until the nail looks normal again. It’s especially important to be patient where toenails are concerned. It can take a year for a healthy big toenail to grow back. Nail fungus can sometimes be very persistent despite treatment. It can also come back after successful treatment.
Ultra-high heels force the feet into a position that puts stress on the ball of the foot. At this critical joint, the long metatarsal bones meet the pea-shaped sesamoid bones, and the toe bones (phalanges). Too much pressure can inflame these bones or the nerves that surround them. Chronic stress to the foot bones can even lead to hairline fractures.
Your physician may perform a simple test called a potassium hydroxide (KOH) preparation for microscopic fungal examination in the office or laboratory. This test can be used to confirm the presence of a fungal infection. This test is performed by using a microscope to examine small flakes of skin from the rash. Many dermatologists perform this test in their office with results available within minutes. Rarely, a small piece of skin may be removed and sent for biopsy or fungal culture to help confirm the diagnosis.
The ease with which the fungus spreads to other areas of the body (on one's fingers) poses another complication. When the fungus is spread to other parts of the body, it can easily be spread back to the feet after the feet have been treated. And because the condition is called something else in each place it takes hold (e.g., tinea corporis (ringworm) or tinea cruris (jock itch), persons infected may not be aware it is the same disease.
Athlete's foot, known medically as tinea pedis, is a common skin infection of the feet caused by fungus.[2] Signs and symptoms often include itching, scaling, cracking and redness.[3] In rare cases the skin may blister.[6] Athlete's foot fungus may infect any part of the foot, but most often grows between the toes.[3] The next most common area is the bottom of the foot.[6] The same fungus may also affect the nails or the hands.[4] It is a member of the group of diseases known as tinea.[7]
Red or black nails due to a hematoma, or blood under the nail, usually occur from trauma (like whacking yourself on the thumb with a hammer). The discolored area will grow out with the nail and be trimmed off as you trim your nails. If you have a black spot under your nail that was not caused by trauma, you may want to see a dermatologist or a podiatrist if it involves a toenail to make sure it is not melanoma (a type of skin cancer associated with pigmented cells). A simple biopsy can rule out malignancy (cancer).
Whitish or yellowish nails can occur due to onycholysis. This means separation of the nail from the nail bed. The color you see is air beneath the nail. The treatment is to trim the nail short, don't clean under it, polish if you want to hide the color, and wait two to three months. Persistent onycholysis can make the nails susceptible to fungal infection.
Baking soda has the ability to dry up the excess moisture on your toes, and it will help neutralize foot odor and act as a toenail fungus treatment. Create a paste using baking soda and water and apply it to the toenail. Let it soak for 10 minutes and then rinse off. You can also create a foot bath by mixing a bucket of water with baking soda and letting your entire foot soak. Check out these other effective home remedies for smelly feet.
Nail fungus is usually harmless. But many people find discolored or thickened nails unpleasant to look at and want to get rid of the fungus as soon as possible. Fungal nail infections can also spread, and may infect other people. Regardless of the treatment you choose, it will take a while until the nail looks normal again. It’s especially important to be patient where toenails are concerned. It can take a year for a healthy big toenail to grow back. Nail fungus can sometimes be very persistent despite treatment. It can also come back after successful treatment.
Nail fungus, or onychomycosis, is a common skin condition where a fungus infects a part of the nail including the bed, matrix, or plate.[1] Nail fungus can result in cosmetic concerns, pain, and discomfort as well as end up affecting your everyday activities. If it is a severe infection, it may cause permanent damage to your nails or may spread beyond your nails.[2] If you know you have toenail fungus, you can follow a few simple steps to get rid of it and return your toenail to its former health.
To get rid of toe fungus, apply 100% tea tree oil to the affected area with a cotton swab twice a day. You can also try applying Vick's VapoRub to your toe every night before you go to sleep, which may make the fungus go away. Another home remedy you can try is snakeroot leaf extract, which may clear up the fungus if you apply it to the affected area every 3 days. If home remedies aren't helping, talk to your doctor about getting an oral or topical antifungal medication.
Fungal infection occurs when the organism invades through an opening in the nail, meaning fungi will usually attack nails that are already damaged. After infection occurs, the growth of the fungi leads to mild inflammation, which causes the nail to thicken and the nail plate to detach from the nail bed. The space underneath the nail can then serve as a reservoir for bacteria and moulds, which can cause the nail to become discoloured.

Walking barefoot in public places: Sure, taking your shoes off may feel great but it can also lead to toenail fungus. Toenail fungus starts when moisture gets trapped under the nail. This can easily happen when you walk barefoot.It is also easy to pick up toenail fungus from walking in public places as fungus can survive for up to 6 months on surfaces. The most common public places where you can pick up toenail fungus include swimming pools and public showers. Protect yourself by wearing sandals in public pool areas and public showers.


This foot fungus treatment contains a fungus that is harmless to the body but still kills the infectious fungus. Mix a cup of cornmeal and two quarts of water in a tub big enough to fit your feet. Let the cornmeal sit in the water for an hour and then soak your foot or feet for a half hour or more. Here are more homemade foot scrub recipes to pamper your feet.
White superficial onychomycosis (WSO) is caused by fungal invasion of the superficial layers of the nail plate to form "white islands" on the plate. It accounts for around 10 percent of onychomycosis cases. In some cases, WSO is a misdiagnosis of "keratin granulations" which are not a fungus, but a reaction to nail polish that can cause the nails to have a chalky white appearance. A laboratory test should be performed to confirm.[15]
Keeping socks and shoes clean (using bleach in the wash) is one way to prevent fungi from taking hold and spreading. Avoiding the sharing of boots and shoes is another way to prevent transmission. Athlete's foot can be transmitted by sharing footwear with an infected person. Hand-me-downs and purchasing used shoes are other forms of shoe-sharing. Not sharing also applies to towels, because, though less common, fungi can be passed along on towels, especially damp ones.
To get rid of toe fungus, apply 100% tea tree oil to the affected area with a cotton swab twice a day. You can also try applying Vick's VapoRub to your toe every night before you go to sleep, which may make the fungus go away. Another home remedy you can try is snakeroot leaf extract, which may clear up the fungus if you apply it to the affected area every 3 days. If home remedies aren't helping, talk to your doctor about getting an oral or topical antifungal medication.
The term "ringworm" or "ringworms" refers to fungal infections that are on the surface of the skin. A physical examination of the affected skin, evaluation of skin scrapings under the microscope, and culture tests can help doctors make the appropriate distinctions. A proper diagnosis is essential to successful treatment. Among the different types of ringworm are the following: tinea barbae, tinea capitis, tinea corporis, tinea cruris, tinea faciei, tinea manus, tinea pedis, and tinea unguium.
Topical nail-bed fungus treatments are a safe option that almost anyone can use. They work best when the infection is treated in its earliest stages. However, these medications do not heal the nail itself, only the fungus growing on the nail bed and surrounding area. Only oral medications, which come with many contraindications and may not be safe for everyone, can treat the nail itself.
Olive leaf extract is also a powerful detoxifier, so you may experience some discomfort when you first begin taking the supplement.  In this case, consider lowering your daily dose while your body sheds the bulk of its stored up toxins.  When you begin to feel revitalized, you can increase your intake to the recommended. Ready to try olive leaf extract? This Maximum Strength Olive Leaf Extract is the most popular supplement.  

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Efinaconazole (Jublia) is a medication that was approved in 2014. It is a topical (applied to the skin) antifungal used for the local treatment of toenail fungus due to two most common fungal species affecting nails (Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes). Once-daily application is required for 48 weeks. The most common side effects of Jublia are ingrown toenails and application site dermatitis and pain.


Patience is key, as treatment duration varies from 2-3 months for oral treatments to up to 12 months for topical treatment. Because the nails take a long time to grow (6 months for fingernails and 12-18 months for toenails), it will take some time for the infection to resolve and the nail appearance to improve, regardless of the type of treatment used. Sometimes treatment may not be successful and your doctor may prescribe a different medication.

To get rid of toe fungus, apply 100% tea tree oil to the affected area with a cotton swab twice a day. You can also try applying Vick's VapoRub to your toe every night before you go to sleep, which may make the fungus go away. Another home remedy you can try is snakeroot leaf extract, which may clear up the fungus if you apply it to the affected area every 3 days. If home remedies aren't helping, talk to your doctor about getting an oral or topical antifungal medication.
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Physical exam alone has been shown to be an unreliable method of diagnosing fungal nails. There are many conditions that can make nails look damaged, so even doctors have a difficult time. In fact, studies have found that only about 50% of cases of abnormal nail appearance were caused by fungus. Therefore, laboratory testing is almost always indicated. Some insurance companies may even ask for a laboratory test confirmation of the diagnosis in order for antifungal medicine to be covered. A nail sample is obtained either by clipping the toenail or by drilling a hole in the nail. That piece of nail is sent to a lab where it can by stained, cultured, or tested by PCR (to identify the genetic material of the organisms) to identify the presence of fungus. Staining and culturing can take up to six weeks to get a result, but PCR to identify the fungal genetic material, if available, can be done in about one day. However, this test is not widely used due to its high cost. If a negative biopsy result is accompanied by high clinical suspicion, such as nails that are ragged, discolored, thickened, and crumbly, it warrants a repeat test due to the prevalence of false-negative results in these tests.
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